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Matches 101 to 150 of 5,969

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101
He was already married when Katy Frank became pregnant, She didn't know he was already married. Church records indicate there were 2 marriage banns for Thomas and Katy before anyone found out he was already married. 
Bingen, Thomas (I5517)
 
102
Her name might actually be Susan Emma, as that is what is on her marriage certificate. However, I'm using it the way it was on her gravestone. 
Bachman, Emma Susan (I4823)
 
103
I had conversations and correspondence with Donald and his wife in the 1970's and 1980's. He told me he was adopted. In July of 2008, I interviewed his sister, Mabel Lein. She told me that Donald's mother had him prior to her marriage to Fred Obenland. When Lillie and Fred married, he adopted Donald. Donald met his future wife in a Baptist Chuch he attended in Chicago. Ruth was working as a secretary at the church. 
Obenland, Donald Keith (I3804)
 
104
Janet was the daughter of Joseph John Malarky and his wife, Edith Elliott. She was born in Indianapolis, Indiana on October 10, 1919 at the Methodist hospital there. She had one brother, Joseph Arthur, born in 1916.

Janet attended Shortridge High School, where she graduated on June 3, 1937. On June 20, 1942, Janet married Charles McHugh. Janet and Charles had no children. Her obituary states that she worked for the Indianapolis Water Company as an accountant and public relations officer.

At some point, Janet and Charles moved to Augusta, Richmond County, Georgia. Their address there was 2977 Foxhall Circle. She was a member of Senior Friends.

Janet passed away at University Hospital in Augusta on October 4, 1999 Her funeral was held at the Thomas L. King Funeral Home in Augusta with Father Stephen Britt officiating. She was buried on October 7th at Westover Memorial Park, also in Augusta. (Section 19, Lot 645, Space 2A.)

Janet's Find A Grave memorial is 35905491.
 
Malarky, Janet Marguerite (I6614)
 
105
John Joseph Malarkey was the son of John J. and Mary Malarkey (nee Joyce). He was born in Girardville, PA on April 7, 1872. Like most of his family, he entered the world with his last name spelled Mullarkey. However, after the birth of his second son, John, the spelling was changed to Malarkey.

John's father was a coal miner and his mother kept house for their large family. John and his siblings grew up in Girardville, PA. John had one brother, Henry and 8 sisters: Bridget (Lauretta), Theresa, Marguerite, Marion, Anna, Catherine and Rosebud. His sisters called him Jack.

John married Mary Ellen Meade, of Limerick, Ireland on July 20, 1898. They were married in New York City. Mary Ellen's parents were John and Johanna Meade, of Limerick, Ireland.

John and Mary Ellen were the parents of 4 children, two boys and two girls. Their first child, a daughter named Mary, was born on May 16, 1899. On Aug. 22, 1901, their son David Joseph was born. A second son, John J. was born Jan. 21, 1905. Theresa was the 4th child of John and Mary Ellen. She was born on Oct. 26, 1909. Unfortunately, she died when she was 8 months old, in July of 1910.

All of John and Mary Ellen's children were born in New York City. They were all baptized in St. Joseph's Church, located on Washington Place and Sixth Ave. in New York City.

On his daughter Mary's birth certificate, John's occupation was listed as an engineer.

Mary Ellen Malarkey died on Oct. 3, 1913. About three weeks after her death, John sent his daughter Mary to live with his sister, Marguerite in Indianapolis, Indiana. The two boys, John and David, were sent to live with foster families.

John's brother, Henry Francis (Harry), his wife and 3 boys were living in New York City at the time of Mary Ellen's death. Today we wonder if John couldn't take care of his children after his wife died, why didn't his brother Harry and wife Julia take them in?

John Malarkey died about 5 years after his wife. We have no record of what John was doing during the time between his wife's death and his death.

John died of tuberculosis at St. Joseph's Hospital, in the Bronx in New York City on March 7, 1919. He was buried two days later in Calvary Cemetery, Woodside, New York. (Plot Section 43 Range 8 Plot B Grave 5)

He has no stone, as he is in a pauper's grave.
 
Malarkey, John Joseph (I6352)
 
106
John Mullarkey (also spelled Malarky and Malarkey) was born in Ireland, maybe in County Mayo or Sligo. His death certificate has little information. It does, however, say that the maiden name of his mother was Bonon. This could also be Bannon or Bohannan or O'Bannon. It lists his age as 64, which means he was probably born in 1845. However, the parish sh records say he as 69 at death, which would indicate he was born in 1840. The 1900 US Census says he was born in March, 1843. I'm using that because either he or his wife gave that info to the census taker. The dates from the death certificate and the parish records were given by others who might not have known his exact age at the time of his death.

According to John's granddaughter Mary Malarkey Starner, John sailed from Liverpool on the Tonawanda in 1864. Immigration records confirm this, saying he arrived in the port of Philadelphia on April 20, 1864. The lady John would eventually marry arrived on the same ship. Whether John and Mary Joyce knew each other before leaving Ireland or whether they met on the voyage to the U.S, we don't know as of 2007.

John Malarkey and Mary Joyce were married in Ashland, Schuylkill County, Pennsylvania on Feb. 4, 1867. The witnesses were Jacob Munley and Mary Joyce. (probably her mother or sister-in-law.)

John and Mary had 9 children: Catherine Ada (1867), Marguerite Ellen (1869), John Joseph, (1872), Harry Francis Sr.(1874), Lauretta Veronica (1876), Marion Madeline (1879), Anna Veronica (1882), Rosebud Violet (1885) and Theresa (1889). Another child, Bridget, is listed in the parish register as also being born in 1876. I don't think she could be Laura's twin who did not survive because in the 1880 census, Laura isn't mentioned (when she should have been) but a Bridget is. It seems as if Bridget changed her name when she left home. Whether it was a legal name change is unknown at this time.

John and Mary moved to Girardville, Schuylkill County, Pennsylvania sometime prior to 1880. John worked in the coal mines in the area and later may have been a shopkeeper. They lived in the "Wild Cat" or "Wild Cat Run" area of Girardville.

On Feb. 21, 1909, John died by accidental drowning. A family story says it was raining heavily during the night and John went to the reservoir to open the flood gates. He fell in and drowned. Several articles about his death and funeral printed at the time say he drowned in a "mine breach." One account said that he was found floating in a dam 15 yds from his home. It also said that John was subject to epileptic spells and it was thought that during one of these spells, he fell into the dam.

Note: His death certificate says he died on the 21st and records at St Joseph's Catholic Church say the date was the 22nd.

High Mass for John took place at Saint Joseph's Catholic Church in Girardville on Feb. 25, 1909. He was buried in the old Saint Joseph's Cemetery with his wife, Mary, who had died in 1905. Parish records also state that he "drowned in dam back of house." Payments for his funeral were High Mass and Burial $11 and Grave Digging $4.50 and $1.50 for something unspecified, for a total of $17.

Note: Saint Joseph's Cemetery is completely overgrown. (see pictures)

On March 1, 1909, Letters of Administration were granted to daughter Rose (Rosebud) Malarkey.

John's Find A Grave Memorial number is 21810001.
 
Mullarkey, John J (I2156)
 
107
Joseph and Loretta met when he and a friend hitch-hiked to Texas. 
Couture, Joseph Robert (I6081)
 
108
Katy didn't know Thomas Bingen was already married when she became pregnant. According to church records, marriage banns were posted for her and Thomas two times before anyone found out he was already married. Katy's parents sent her to St. Francis Convent, where she had her baby. 
Frank, Katherine (I5518)
 
109
Lillian might not exist. I've found records where Anna Juliana Obenland is called "Lilly". 
Unknown, Lillian (I11776)
 
110
Liz, Robert's sister said in an email, "Bob loved baseball and particularly the NY Yankees. He enjoyed sports, telling bad jokes and teasing his sisters. He played basketball in the driveway--sometimes during summer rainstorms (make that, downpours) which earned him the nickname, "The Monsoon" or "Monsoon Bob." He enjoyed beating me [Liz] at a game called "Acey--Duecey" which is similar to Back Gammon. he played video games. He impersonated televison celebrities. He blew into a conch seashell and could make it sing...a bit like a Norseman blowing a horn. This is how we always rang in the New Year. I miss him." 
Malarkey, Robert James (I11218)
 
111
Louis, his wife and two children are listed twice in the 1920 Census. On 14 or 15 January, 1920, they were listed in Batesville, Ripley County, Indiana. Right after that, they moved to Roswell, Chaves County, New Mexico, because on either 26 or 27 January 1920, they are listed in that city. 
Cook, Louis C (I6176)
 
112
Maiden name is either Hayden or Eayden. 
Hayden, Eleanora Lounette (I4813)
 
113
Marguerite Malarky was the 2nd oldest child of John and Mary (Joyce) Mullarkey. Marguerite was born in Ashland, Schuylkill County, Pennsylvania on September 9, 1869. She was baptized 3 days later at St Joseph's Church in Ashland by Rev John J O'Reillly. Her sponsors were Edward Joyce and Mary L. Joyce. Edward and Mary L. must have been relatives of Marguerite's mother, Mary.

There are several questions regarding Marguerite. I think all of them can be explained by a bit of vanity, maybe some good business sense and in one instance, a sign of the times.

The birth date above is from Marguerite's Certificate of Baptism. Marguerite's Internment Order for her burial states her birth year as 1873. I've found that over her life, she seemed to use a birth date that made her about five years younger than she really was.

In the 1900 and 1910 Federal Census, her mother is listed as being born in Ireland. Beginning in 1920, Marguerite said her mother was born in France. Did she do this because she felt that would make her business more successful? Would her skills seem more glamorous if her mother had learned the trade in France rather than Ireland?

Marquerite is listed in the 1900 Census as living at 634 S. 16th Steet, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania with her sisters Anna and Lauretta. Also living with them was a brother, Joseph, born in about 1888. Strangely, there is no record of a brother named Joseph being born in the family.

There is no record of Marguerite ever marrying. In fact, her Interment Order shows her name at death to be Marguerite Malarkey. However,in some newspaper articles, Marguerite is referred to as Mrs.

I found Marguerite listed in many Indianapolis city directories from 1906-1945. In 1909, she is listed as the widow of Fred Malarky. In 1912, he is listed as Fredrick. Marguerite listed herself as the widow of Joseph Malarkey in the 1935 directory.

In the 1900 Census, Marguerite is listed as single, and Joseph was her brother. Beginning in the 1910 Census, she is a widow. In 1940, she is living with Joseph and his wife and was listed as his mother.

A letter from a Joseph Arthur Malarky living in Phoenix, Arizona in 1977 states in part, "...my grandmother Marguerite...." Joseph Arthur was the son of Joseph Malarky, listed as both brother and later son to Marguerite.

I believe that Joseph was Marguerite's son, born out-of-wedlock.

According to her niece, Mary Malarkey Starner, Marguerite left Philadelphia for Chicago around the turn of the century. She became a dress designer with the exclusive establishment of Couturier, Inc., located on Michigan Blvd. The company was owned by the brother and sister team of Katherine and Harry Strickland.

In about 1903 or 1904, Marguerite left the Strickland firm to accept a position of head designer and manager of the Custom Made Dept. of H.P. Wasson Company in Indianapolis, Indiana. This was one of the leading department stores in the city.

Katherine Strickland and Marguerite remained close friends throughout the years. They traveled, usually in July and August, through Europe before attending the fashion shows in Paris in September. There are passenger lists showing Marguerite made trips to Europe after 1900. Passenger lists show she left Liverpool for New York at the end of her trip in 1904. According to her sister, Anna, Marguerite visited her sister Catherine (Kit) in Ireland, the first time being in 1904. This is perhaps why Marguerite sailed for home from Liverpool, instead of Cherbourg, France, like she did in 1906, 1907, 1908, 1910, and 1911. If there are records of her travels for the missing years above, I haven't located them as yet.

During one of these trips, Marguerite and her friend Katherine Strickland attended the "Passion Play" in Oberammergau, which is presented once every 10 years.

After WWI started, the European trips ended. The top Paris designers held their shows in the spring and fall in New York City.

In 1915, the last member of the Wasson family died and the store was sold. The new owners wanted Marguerite to stay on, but she had other plans. She opened her own business and continued to operate it until about 1939 or 1940. At that time the business became less profitable due to the impact "Ready to Wear" had made on the "custom made" establishments after WWI.

The Malarky establishment not only enjoyed the most elite clientèle of Indianapolis, but also of the state. A client of hers, Mrs. Charles (Harriette) Anthony of Muncie, Indiana made headlines by wearing diamonds in her heels to the Inaugural Ball of President Taft. Her gown was designed and made by Marguerite.

In 1913, Marguerite's sister-in-law (brother John Joseph's wife) passed away in New York City. The couple had two sons and a daughter. That daughter, Mary Malarkey Starner, wrote to me, "I might add that I was sent out to Indianapolis to what I thought was to be a visit with Aunt Marguerite whom I had never seen. As it was, it was to be a "permanent" visit which took place about 3 weeks after my mother died. I shall always be extremely grateful to her and her family for giving me the opportunity to enjoy a normal home life besides many other advantages in life. Without her kindness and generosity, I, too, might have been placed in a foster home." Evidentially, Mary's father didn't feel like he could take care of the three children after his wife died. The two boys were sent to foster homes and Mary was sent to live with Marguerite. Mary was 14, David was 12 and John Joseph Jr was only 8 years old at that time.

After Marguerite closed her business she went to California for about a year, visiting with her sisters Anna, Laura, Tay, Marion and Rose as they were living in California at that time. She returned to Indianapolis in about 1941 and lived with her son Joe and his family until her death in 1954. According to her death certificate, she died of "carcinomatosis, probably pulmonary." She was also suffering from arteriosclerosis. Marguerite's address at the time of her death was 4602 Guilford, Indianapolis, Indiana.

Marguerite was buried on April 26, 1954 at Crown Hill Cemetery in Indianapolis. Her plot is Lot 386, Section 66, Grave 1.

Her Find a Grave memorial number is 21853580.
 
Malarky, Marguerite Ellen (I6349)
 
114
Marguerite Malarky was the 2nd oldest child of John and Mary (Joyce) Mullarkey. Marguerite was born in Ashland, Schuylkill County, Pennsylvania on September 9, 1869. She was baptized 3 days later at St Joseph's Church in Ashland by Rev John J O'Reillly. Her sponsors were Edward Joyce and Mary L. Joyce. Edward and Mary L. must have been relatives of Marguerite's mother, Mary.

There are several questions regarding Marguerite. I think all of them can be explained by a bit of vanity, maybe some good business sense and in one instance, a sign of the times.

The birth date above is from Marguerite's Certificate of Baptism. Marguerite's Internment Order for her burial states her birth year as 1873. I've found that over her life, she seemed to use a birth date that made her about five years younger than she really was.

In the 1900 and 1910 Federal Census, her mother is listed as being born in Ireland. Beginning in 1920, Marguerite said her mother was born in France. Did she do this because she felt that would make her business more successful? Would her skills seem more glamorous if her mother had learned the trade in France rather than Ireland?

Marquerite is listed in the 1900 Census as living at 634 S. 16th Steet, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania with her sisters Anna and Lauretta. Also living with them was a brother, Joseph, born in about 1888. Strangely, there is no record of a brother named Joseph being born in the family.

There is no record of Marguerite ever marrying. In fact, her Interment Order shows her name at death to be Marguerite Malarkey. However,in some newspaper articles, Marguerite is referred to as Mrs.

I found Marguerite listed in many Indianapolis city directories from 1906-1945. In 1909, she is listed as the widow of Fred Malarky. In 1912, he is listed as Fredrick. Marguerite listed herself as the widow of Joseph Malarkey in the 1935 directory.

In the 1900 Census, Marguerite is listed as single, and Joseph was her brother. Beginning in the 1910 Census, she is a widow. In 1940, she is living with Joseph and his wife and was listed as his mother.

A letter from a Joseph Arthur Malarky living in Phoenix, Arizona in 1977 states in part, "...my grandmother Marguerite...." Joseph Arthur was the son of Joseph Malarky, listed as both brother and later son to Marguerite.

I believe that Joseph was Marguerite's son, born out-of-wedlock.

According to her niece, Mary Malarkey Starner, Marguerite left Philadelphia for Chicago around the turn of the century. She became a dress designer with the exclusive establishment of Couturier, Inc., located on Michigan Blvd. The company was owned by the brother and sister team of Katherine and Harry Strickland.

In about 1903 or 1904, Marguerite left the Strickland firm to accept a position of head designer and manager of the Custom Made Dept. of H.P. Wasson Company in Indianapolis, Indiana. This was one of the leading department stores in the city.

Katherine Strickland and Marguerite remained close friends throughout the years. They traveled, usually in July and August, through Europe before attending the fashion shows in Paris in September. There are passenger lists showing Marguerite made trips to Europe after 1900. Passenger lists show she left Liverpool for New York at the end of her trip in 1904. According to her sister, Anna, Marguerite visited her sister Catherine (Kit) in Ireland, the first time being in 1904. This is perhaps why Marguerite sailed for home from Liverpool, instead of Cherbourg, France, like she did in 1906, 1907, 1908, 1910, and 1911. If there are records of her travels for the missing years above, I haven't located them as yet.

During one of these trips, Marguerite and her friend Katherine Strickland attended the "Passion Play" in Oberammergau, which is presented once every 10 years.

After WWI started, the European trips ended. The top Paris designers held their shows in the spring and fall in New York City.

In 1915, the last member of the Wasson family died and the store was sold. The new owners wanted Marguerite to stay on, but she had other plans. She opened her own business and continued to operate it until about 1939 or 1940. At that time the business became less profitable due to the impact "Ready to Wear" had made on the "custom made" establishments after WWI.

The Malarky establishment not only enjoyed the most elite clientèle of Indianapolis, but also of the state. A client of hers, Mrs. Charles (Harriette) Anthony of Muncie, Indiana made headlines by wearing diamonds in her heels to the Inaugural Ball of President Taft. Her gown was designed and made by Marguerite.

In 1913, Marguerite's sister-in-law (brother John Joseph's wife) passed away in New York City. The couple had two sons and a daughter. That daughter, Mary Malarkey Starner, wrote to me, "I might add that I was sent out to Indianapolis to what I thought was to be a visit with Aunt Marguerite whom I had never seen. As it was, it was to be a "permanent" visit which took place about 3 weeks after my mother died. I shall always be extremely grateful to her and her family for giving me the opportunity to enjoy a normal home life besides many other advantages in life. Without her kindness and generosity, I, too, might have been placed in a foster home." Evidentially, Mary's father didn't feel like he could take care of the three children after his wife died. The two boys were sent to foster homes and Mary was sent to live with Marguerite. Mary was 14, David was 12 and John Joseph Jr was only 8 years old at that time.

After Marguerite closed her business she went to California for about a year, visiting with her sisters Anna, Laura, Tay, Marion and Rose as they were living in California at that time. She returned to Indianapolis in about 1941 and lived with her son Joe and his family until her death in 1954. According to her death certificate, she died of "carcinomatosis, probably pulmonary." She was also suffering from arteriosclerosis. Marguerite's address at the time of her death was 4602 Guilford, Indianapolis, Indiana.

Marguerite was buried on April 26, 1954 at Crown Hill Cemetery in Indianapolis. Her plot is Lot 386, Section 66, Grave 1.

Her Find a Grave memorial number is 21853580.
 
Malarky, Marguerite Ellen (I6349)
 
115
Marguerite Malarky was the 2nd oldest child of John and Mary (Joyce) Mullarkey. Marguerite was born in Ashland, Schuylkill County, Pennsylvania on September 9, 1869. She was baptized 3 days later at St Joseph's Church in Ashland by Rev John J O'Reillly. Her sponsors were Edward Joyce and Mary L. Joyce. Edward and Mary L. must have been relatives of Marguerite's mother, Mary.

There are several questions regarding Marguerite. I think all of them can be explained by a bit of vanity, maybe some good business sense and in one instance, a sign of the times.

The birth date above is from Marguerite's Certificate of Baptism. Marguerite's Internment Order for her burial states her birth year as 1873. I've found that over her life, she seemed to use a birth date that made her about five years younger than she really was.

In the 1900 and 1910 Federal Census, her mother is listed as being born in Ireland. Beginning in 1920, Marguerite said her mother was born in France. Did she do this because she felt that would make her business more successful? Would her skills seem more glamorous if her mother had learned the trade in France rather than Ireland?

Marquerite is listed in the 1900 Census as living at 634 S. 16th Steet, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania with her sisters Anna and Lauretta. Also living with them was a brother, Joseph, born in about 1888. Strangely, there is no record of a brother named Joseph being born in the family.

There is no record of Marguerite ever marrying. In fact, her Interment Order shows her name at death to be Marguerite Malarkey. However,in some newspaper articles, Marguerite is referred to as Mrs.

I found Marguerite listed in many Indianapolis city directories from 1906-1945. In 1909, she is listed as the widow of Fred Malarky. In 1912, he is listed as Fredrick. Marguerite listed herself as the widow of Joseph Malarkey in the 1935 directory.

In the 1900 Census, Marguerite is listed as single, and Joseph was her brother. Beginning in the 1910 Census, she is a widow. In 1940, she is living with Joseph and his wife and was listed as his mother.

A letter from a Joseph Arthur Malarky living in Phoenix, Arizona in 1977 states in part, "...my grandmother Marguerite...." Joseph Arthur was the son of Joseph Malarky, listed as both brother and later son to Marguerite.

I believe that Joseph was Marguerite's son, born out-of-wedlock.

According to her niece, Mary Malarkey Starner, Marguerite left Philadelphia for Chicago around the turn of the century. She became a dress designer with the exclusive establishment of Couturier, Inc., located on Michigan Blvd. The company was owned by the brother and sister team of Katherine and Harry Strickland.

In about 1903 or 1904, Marguerite left the Strickland firm to accept a position of head designer and manager of the Custom Made Dept. of H.P. Wasson Company in Indianapolis, Indiana. This was one of the leading department stores in the city.

Katherine Strickland and Marguerite remained close friends throughout the years. They traveled, usually in July and August, through Europe before attending the fashion shows in Paris in September. There are passenger lists showing Marguerite made trips to Europe after 1900. Passenger lists show she left Liverpool for New York at the end of her trip in 1904. According to her sister, Anna, Marguerite visited her sister Catherine (Kit) in Ireland, the first time being in 1904. This is perhaps why Marguerite sailed for home from Liverpool, instead of Cherbourg, France, like she did in 1906, 1907, 1908, 1910, and 1911. If there are records of her travels for the missing years above, I haven't located them as yet.

During one of these trips, Marguerite and her friend Katherine Strickland attended the "Passion Play" in Oberammergau, which is presented once every 10 years.

After WWI started, the European trips ended. The top Paris designers held their shows in the spring and fall in New York City.

In 1915, the last member of the Wasson family died and the store was sold. The new owners wanted Marguerite to stay on, but she had other plans. She opened her own business and continued to operate it until about 1939 or 1940. At that time the business became less profitable due to the impact "Ready to Wear" had made on the "custom made" establishments after WWI.

The Malarky establishment not only enjoyed the most elite clientèle of Indianapolis, but also of the state. A client of hers, Mrs. Charles (Harriette) Anthony of Muncie, Indiana made headlines by wearing diamonds in her heels to the Inaugural Ball of President Taft. Her gown was designed and made by Marguerite.

In 1913, Marguerite's sister-in-law (brother John Joseph's wife) passed away in New York City. The couple had two sons and a daughter. That daughter, Mary Malarkey Starner, wrote to me, "I might add that I was sent out to Indianapolis to what I thought was to be a visit with Aunt Marguerite whom I had never seen. As it was, it was to be a "permanent" visit which took place about 3 weeks after my mother died. I shall always be extremely grateful to her and her family for giving me the opportunity to enjoy a normal home life besides many other advantages in life. Without her kindness and generosity, I, too, might have been placed in a foster home." Evidentially, Mary's father didn't feel like he could take care of the three children after his wife died. The two boys were sent to foster homes and Mary was sent to live with Marguerite. Mary was 14, David was 12 and John Joseph Jr was only 8 years old at that time.

After Marguerite closed her business she went to California for about a year, visiting with her sisters Anna, Laura, Tay, Marion and Rose as they were living in California at that time. She returned to Indianapolis in about 1941 and lived with her son Joe and his family until her death in 1954. According to her death certificate, she died of "carcinomatosis, probably pulmonary." She was also suffering from arteriosclerosis. Marguerite's address at the time of her death was 4602 Guilford, Indianapolis, Indiana.

Marguerite was buried on April 26, 1954 at Crown Hill Cemetery in Indianapolis. Her plot is Lot 386, Section 66, Grave 1.

Her Find a Grave memorial number is 21853580.
 
Malarky, Marguerite Ellen (I6349)
 
116
Mary Ellen Meade was born in Limerick, Ireland. Her parents were John and Johanna Meade.

On July 20, 1898 Mary married John Joseph Malarkey. They were married in New York City, New York.

Mary and John had 4 children. Their first child, Mary, was born on May 16, 1899. A son, David, was born Aug. 22, 1901. John, named after his father, was born on Jan 21, 1905. The couple's last child, a daughter they named Theresa, was born on Oct. 26, 1909. Unfortunately, Theresa lived only 8 months. She died on July 16, 1910.

Mary Malarkey died on Oct. 3, 1913 at the age of 38. Her death certificate says at the top that she died at St. Vincent Hospital. Further down it states, "...and I further certify that I have this 3rd day of Oct, 1913, taken charge of the body of deceased found at 69 Carmine St. and that an inquest thereon is pending." It was signed by the coroner. It's unclear if she was still alive and then taken to the hospital where she died or if she died at home. The cause of death was "acute gastritis (not toxic.)

She was buried in Calvary Cemetery two days later. Her plot is Sect. 43, Range 8, Plot B, Grave #5. This was a plot in an area reserved for the poor. Her grave is unmarked.
 
Meade, Mary Ellen (I11202)
 
117
Mary Malarkey was born Mary Joyce in Ireland. (Another variation of the last name is Joice.) Her parents are unknown at this time. And, I haven't been able to find where Mary was born. Unfortunately, death records in the county weren't recorded until 1905 and church records don't list the parents' names nor the place of birth. The exact date of her birth is not known, however, the parish records say she was 62 at the time of her death. Given that, she was probably born in 1843. Her passenger list in 1864 states that she was 20, which would make her birth year at about 1843 or 1844. The 1900 Census says that she was born in January of 1843 or 1845.

Mary arrived in the port of Philadelphia on April 20, 1864. She had sailed from Liverpool on the Tonawanda. John Mullarkey was also on the ship. Whether he and Mary had known each other in Ireland or whether they met on the crossing, we just don't know. Also on the voyage was a Patrick Joyce and his family. Patrick was 40 years old at the time. He is the right age for Mary's father, but Mary was not traveling with that family. She is listed alone.

John and Mary were united in marriage on Feb. 4, 1867 in Ashland, Schuylkill County, Pennsylvania. The witnesses were Jacob Munley and Mary Joyce. (Probably her mother or sister-in-law)

John and Mary had 9 children: Catherine Ada (1867), Marguerite Ellen (1869), John Joseph, (1872), Harry Francis Sr.(1874), Lauretta (AKA Bridget) Veronica (1876), Marion Madeline (1879), Anna Veronica (1882), Rosebud Violet (1885) and Theresa (1889). Another child, Bridget, is listed in the parish register as also being born in 1876. I don't think she could be Laura's twin who did not survive because in the 1880 census, Laura isn't mentioned (when she should have been) but a Bridget is. It seems as if Bridget changed her name to Lauretta when she left home. Whether is was a legal name change is unknown.

Mary's husband worked in the coal mines in the area and later may have been a shopkeeper while Mary took care of the home and family. They lived in the "Wild Cat" or "Wild Cat Run" area of Girardville.

Mary died Nov. 1, 1905. Saint Joseph's parish records say that she died of "neuralgia of the heart." She was buried in St. Joseph's Cemetery in Girardville after a High Mass on Nov. 4, 1905. These records state that the costs were: Lot $20, High Mass and Burial $11, Fence $2, Grave digging $4.50, for a total of $37.50

Mary's Find A Grave Memorial number is 21826545.
 
Joyce, Mary (I1679)
 
118
Middle initial might be S, or middle name might be Eugene. 
Curry, Thomas (I4842)
 
119
Middle name might also be Alberta 
Kraus, Josephine Albertine (I5524)
 
120
Millville's first glass works were started in 1806 by James Lee. Lee originally named the factory Glasstown. The original factory made window glass, and it later expanded to making bottles in 1809, presumably vials and junk bottle (common Farmer bottles). James was the son of Francis Lee who came from Belfast, Ireland, to Pennsylvania.

In 1799 James Lee built a glass factory in Port Elizabeth New Jersey, which he called the Eagle Glass Works. He then left Port Elizabeth and established the factory here in Millville in 1806.
A gentleman from the early days describes Lee as a promoter who abandoned one newly established enterprise after another. Lucius Elmer describes Lee as "an active enterprising man, too spasmodic in his efforts to succeed well." By 1814 Lee sold his Millville factory to Gideon Scull. In 1814 he moved to Bridgeton and built a saw mill (originally planned to be a paper mill), a general store and a raceway from the new mill dam on the Cohansey river. In 1817 Lee and his family moved to Cincinnati after a short stay to Maysville, Kentucky. He died in New Orleans in 1824.

The bottle shown here was found on the site of James Lee's Glasstown glass works in 1984 by a backhoe operator friend of mine named Ed Fredricks.Ed was grading an area at the end of Buck Street near present day Rte. 49 behind the American Legion hall near the river for a future boat slip when a lot of broken glass cullet and other factory remnants were being found in large amounts.This bottle survived and is a very pretty pale aquamarine in color very typical of the sand from Cumberland county that to this day is some of the purest in the world.

A lot of the sand from here was shipped as far away as New England in the early 1800s. Ed has given me quite a few old bottles over the years as he is constantly digging foundations, swimming pools,sidewalks,driveways ect. I am very great full to Ed for all of the bottles I have received from him over the last thirty years.This bottle is very small for a vial standing just two and a half inches tall and three quarters of an inch in diameter.The walls of the glass are very thin but the flared lip is intact. I also have shards and cullet from the site I just cant seem to be able to locate them right now for this post.When I find them I will add them to this information.

In 1827, the company had three owners: Dr. George Burgin, Richard L. Wood, and Joel Bodine. Bodine left the company in 1829 and the company name changed to Burgin & Wood. With the addition of a new partner in 1833, the company?s name changed again to Burgin, Wood & Pearsall. At this time, the factory produced glass bottles using molds made out of clay.

Glasstown was purchased in 1836 by another company that changed the name to Scattergood, Booth, and Company. Following this transition of owners, Scattergood married a woman named Sarah Whitall. Sarah was the sister of Captain John Whitall, a major investor in the Glasstown factory. When Captain Whitall moved to Philadelphia with his new wife, Mary Tatum, he left the factory under his brother?s management. For the next three years, Captain Whitall?s brother, Israel Franklin Whitall, served as manager of the company .

By 1845 Scattergood no longer worked at Glasstown and the name was changed to Whitall, Brother, and Company.Israel Whitall became ill and ceased to work for the company after 1857 and a new partner a man named Edward Tatum became one of the owners. At this time, the company became Whitall Tatum and Company. The company quickly became very successful and additional space and buildings were needed and the company expanded northward up Buck street.. The company opened An office in New York and was managed by C.A. Tatum.

Whitall Tatum was one of the first glass factories to establish a laboratory. Here they tested different procedures and combinations of materials used in glass production . By 1899, business was booming and the Whitall Tatum Company had over four hundred employees at their Glasstown factory and over one thousand at their lower works division. As a result of their success, Millville, New Jersey became famous for glass working. I know the bottle could have come from anyone really over the last 175 years but it was found at the original glass works site and in an area which produced the same colored shards and broken tops like this one.This bottle also has a lean to one side.I wonder if it was a reject and sent to the cullet heap.
 
Lee, James Alexander (I7017)
 
121
More weight is given to the birth year and place stated on his marriage record to his first wife, Anna Juliana. That information was first hand, given by the groom himself. (As opposed to the year and place on his death certificate. That info was given by his wife after his death.

In the 1910 Census, there is a George W Lane, wife Lillie at 180 Park Ave., Brooklyn.
George: 56, born abt 1854; Switchman for a railroad
Lillie: 28, born abt 1882; 0/0 children

married 3 years, mar abt 1907

1920 Same people in same location
George M Lane, 61, born abt 1859, watchman for a railroad
Lillie 58, born in about 1862
 
Lane, George W (I7175)
 
122
Mother would be Kathy Blick or Leslie L Unknown. 
Peters, Nathan L (I5456)
 
123
Mother would be Kathy Blick or Leslie L Unknown. 
Peters, Gina M (I5457)
 
124
Mother would be Kathy Blick or Leslie L Unknown. 
Peters, Brittani (I5458)
 
125
Mother would be Kathy Blick or Leslie L Unknown. 
Peters, Brianna R (I5459)
 
126
Nicholas was born March 18, 1903 in Enniscorthy, County Wexford, Ireland. He was the son of Peter Aloysius Sinnott and his wife, Catherine Malarkey, who were both United States citizens of recent Irish descent.

The 1911 Irish Census lists Nicholas living with his parents and sister, Eleanor, at 29 Sandwith St, in Dublin. The census says that all four lived in one room.

Nicholas died on May 4, 1925 at the age of 22 and is buried with his family in Dean's Grange Cemetery in Dublin, #25-F3-North. The cemetery records say that he died at 38 Denzile St. On 11 Mar 2014, I checked Google Earth, but could not find a Denzile St. I did, however, find a Denzille Lane.

Family lore says that he was imprisoned during the Easter Rising in 1916 and died either in prison or after being released. This doesn't sound correct, as Nicholas would have only been 13 at the time. However, these is an outside chance that he could have taken a small part in the rebellion, but I don't know how to find that out.

Nicholas's Find A Grave memorial number is 36159144
 
Sinnott, Nicholas John (I6620)
 
127
Obituary:

HELEN BEATRICE MALARKEY

Longtime Staten Islander Helen B. Malarkey, 84, of Great Kills, a World War II Navy nurse who worked alongside her husband in his Great Kills practice, died Friday at home.

Born Helen B. Norkelunas in Montreal, Canada, she moved to Rochester, N.Y., with her family when she was 2 years old.

She earned a nursing degree from the University of Rochester, where she met her husband, Edward Malarkey, then a medical student.

When World War II began, Mrs. Malarkey was determined to join the fight, but was initially rejected from the U.S. military for having been born outside the country. Refusing to be denied, she made a personal appeal to the Secretary of the Navy, who acquiesced and gave her special dispensation. According to her family, Mrs. Malarkey became a Navy flight nurse, serving in the Pacific from 1943 until the war ended in 1945.

Upon her return home, she married Dr. Malarkey.

The couple moved to Westerleigh in 1946 and briefly lived in Prince's Bay before settling in Great Kills in 1955. There, Dr. Malarkey launched a thriving medical practice, with his wife working as a nurse by his side.

After 32 years of marriage, Dr. Malarkey died in 1977.

For the next 11 years, Mrs. Malarkey worked at what now is Eger Health Care and Rehabilitation Center, Egbertville. She retired in 1988.

Mrs. Malarkey was a parishioner of St. Clare's R.C. Church, Great Kills.

"She was really a remarkably thoughtful and generous friend," said her daughter, Margo Malarkey. "Her friends were just really touched by knowing her. She was also a fabulous mother, of course."

Mrs. Marlarkey was a member of the Women's Auxiliary of the Richmond County Medical Society.

In addition to her daughter, Margo, surviving are two more daughters, Barbara Malarkey and Elizabeth Josephson; her two sons, Peter E. and Robert J., and a grandson.

The funeral will be tomorrow from the Casey-McCallum-Rice South Shore Funeral Home, Great Kills, with a mass at 11 a.m. in St. Clare's Church. Burial will follow in Moravian Cemetery, New Dorp.

The Staten Island Advance
Staten Island, NY
31 Oct 2004

From the files of
Cecilia Ann Obenland Backhaus Joder 
Norkelunas, Helen Beatrice (I11213)
 
128
On September 26, 1877, Gustave Franklin Obenland was born. He was the son of German immigrants Ernst Gottlieb Obenland and his wife, Mary Agnes Burkhart. Gustave, or Gus, as he was called, was born in Glen Ellen, Sonoma County, California.

Sonoma County is sometimes called the Valley of the Moon, or Valley of the Moons. The Miwok tribe named the area "Valley of the Moon" or "Many Moons" because their legends had it that the moon seemed to rise from the valley or may have rose multiple times in just one night.

Gus had five siblings: Christian G.E, Elizabeth Louise, Adolph Emil, Bertha Rose and Anna Agnes. Their father was a farmer while Mary kept house for the family.

In the fall of 1881, Ernst moved his family to Pomeroy, Garfield Co., Washington Territory. The 1898 Census of Garfield County, Washington lists 20 year old Gustave as working as a laborer. Later, he worked as a clerk in a grocery store.

In 1902, Gus went to Philadelphia where he learned the jeweler trade. During his time there, he completed a large pewter engraving that showcased his engraving skills. This engraving is kind of like a sampler that young girls embroidered during the 1700's and 1800's.

While in Philadelphia, Gus met a young seamstress named Anna Veronica Malarkey. He and Anna were married on August 30, 1904 in Anna's hometown of Girardville, Pennsylvania. They had one child, a son they named Harold Edwin, born on July 3, 1905 in Birmingham, Alabama.

Gus and Anna moved around quite a bit during their marriage. Records show them living in Birmingham, Alabama; Shreveport, Louisiana; Ft. Worth, Texas; Everett, Washington; Goldfield, Nevada and Richmond, California.
At one time, Gus owned a jewlery store in Richmond, at 917 McDonald Ave.

On September 12, 1918, Gus registered for the draft of WWI. His registration says that he was of medium height and build, with blue eyes and red hair.

Gus was an avid fisherman, a sport that seemes to run in the family. His brother Adolph and son Harold were all fishermen. Even his great-grandson Keith, born in 1976, also loves to fish. Gus was even arrested in 1924 in Oakland for having taken too many crabs from the ocean. (see attached article). In the 1920's, Gus was an active member of the Richmond Lodge #13, Knights of Pythias. An article in the Oakland Tribune from September 25, 1921, states that he had been elected Prelate of the lodge. I assume this must mean president.

The actual date of Gustave's divorce from Anna is unknown, but it had to have been between 1920 and 1930. They are listed together in at 413 10th Street in Richmond, California during the 1920 Census. The 1930 census shows Gus, as single and living at 925 Roble Ave. in Menlo Park, a city just southwest of Richmond in San Mateo County, California. In that census, Gus owned the house which had a value of $5,000 at that time. Living with Gus was a Hilda Moore, who was his housekeeper. Whether she actually was his housekeeper at that time is unknown. She might have just been living with him as his "paramour".

They eventually did live as man and wife, and Hilda told people that they were married. Letters and depositions in Gus's granddaughter's possession state that prior to his death, Gus had told his brother Adolph that he and Hilda were NOT married, even though she claimed they were. After Gus's death, Hilda claimed she and Gus were married in a town outside of Tiajuana, Mexico. When pressed, she couldn't remember the name of the town, nor could she produce a wedding certificate or any witnesses to the marriage.

In 1943, Gus moved back to Pomeroy, where he had grown up. Hilda went with him. Gus purchased a large Victorian house at 184 8th Street. The purchase price was $2,000. The deed was made September 1, 1943 and recorded in Garfield County on September 16, 1943. (Volume 42, page 303) Two months later, Gus transfered the house to Hilda, with the deed signed on November 3, 1943. The recording date of this deed is unknown at this time.

On March 14, 1944, Gus passed away. He and Hilda had made the trip to Lewiston, Idaho for some errands. While waiting in his car for Hilda to finish her shopping, Gus died. The cause of death on the death certificate says, "patient dead when I arrived. Evidentally due to coronary thrombosis." Gus's residence listed on his death certificate was 681 4th Street in Pomeroy. He was not living in the house on 8th Street when he died. Gus died without a will. At least, that is what Hilda said!

Only ten days after Gus's death, on March 24, 1944, Hilda signed a deed transferring the house on 8th Street to Gus's cousin Ray Shuck and his wife, Zelda. They purchased the house for only $10. This deed was not recorded until July 25, 1944.

In the terms of Anna's divorce from Gus, she was awarded monthly alimony. Gus's son, Harold, fought for part of his father's estate, as his mother, Anna, was owed about $9,000 in back alimony, which was a lot of money in those days.

An affidavit from a George Bromage stated that his ex-wife Ada Bromage was an old friend of Hilda's. Hilda had enlisted the help of Ada Bromage and Zelda Schuck in Pomeroy to help Hilda remove from Pomeroy the cash and jewelry of Gus's estate. Together, the three women smuggled about $35,000 in cash and jewelry from Pomeroy to Mr. Bromage's house in California, just after Gustave's death. Some of the money went to White Bird, Idaho.

In the end, the court awarded Hilda the estate. There was nothing left to be awarded to Anna, as the court valued the estate at under $3,000. This, of course, did not include the cash and jewelry smuggled out of Washington by Hilda and her accomplices, which comprised the bulk of Gustave's estate.

Gus was buried in the Pomeroy City Cemetery. Hilda left Pomeroy shortly after the estate was settled and moved to San Francisco, California. She died two years later. One wonders if she sold the gold and jewelry smuggled out of Washington and what she did with all of the money? Did she die without spending it all? If so, what happened to it? 
Obenland, Gustave Franklin (I3679)
 
129
Peter was born in St John's County, New Brunswick, Canada, the son of Nicholas Sinnott and his wife, Catherine Fitzpatrick. At a date as yet unknown, Peter married Mary Catherine Breen. She was also a native of St. John's County, New Brunswick.

On April 29, 1849, the couple arrived in New York. Their first two children, Elizabeth (about 1852) and Mary Catherine (about 1853) were born.

Peter Jr was born in 1854 and William James was born in 1855. Both of the boys were born in Boston, Massachusetts.

Sometime after that, the family moved to Providence, Rhode Island. Madaline, Eleanor, Florina, Louise, Nicholas Vincent and Nellie were all born there. Nicholas, Florina and Louise passed away when they were babies.

Peter was a shopkeeper in Providence, selling wholesale liquor. He was also a member of an organization called Adopted Citizens of Rhode Island. For a time he served as its secretary.

On November 19, 1863, Peter became a Naturalized Citizen. This took place in the US Circuit Court in Providence, Rhode Island.

Sometime prior to April, 1873, Peter traveled to his family home in Enniscorthy, County Wexford, Ireland. It's unclear if this was a visit or on family business. Unfortunately, he contracted bronchitis while there.

On May 12, 1873, the Providence Evening Press ran Peter's death notice. It says he passed away in Enniscorthy on April 26th. As of this writing, its unclear if he was buried in Ireland or if his body was returned to the United States and he was buried in Providence.

His Find a Grave memorial number is 126452751
 
Sinnott, Peter Aloysius Sr (I6623)
 
130
Peter was born in St John's County, New Brunswick, Canada, the son of Nicholas Sinnott and his wife, Catherine Fitzpatrick. At a date as yet unknown, Peter married Mary Catherine Breen. She was also a native of St. John's County, New Brunswick.

On April 29, 1849, the couple arrived in New York. Their first two children, Elizabeth (about 1852) and Mary Catherine (about 1853) were born.

Peter Jr was born in 1854 and William James was born in 1855. Both of the boys were born in Boston, Massachusetts.

Sometime after that, the family moved to Providence, Rhode Island. Madaline, Eleanor, Florina, Louise, Nicholas Vincent and Nellie were all born there. Nicholas, Florina and Louise passed away when they were babies.

Peter was a shopkeeper in Providence, selling wholesale liquor. He was also a member of an organization called Adopted Citizens of Rhode Island. For a time he served as its secretary.

On November 19, 1863, Peter became a Naturalized Citizen. This took place in the US Circuit Court in Providence, Rhode Island.

Sometime prior to April, 1873, Peter traveled to his family home in Enniscorthy, County Wexford, Ireland. It's unclear if this was a visit or on family business. Unfortunately, he contracted bronchitis while there.

On May 12, 1873, the Providence Evening Press ran Peter's death notice. It says he passed away in Enniscorthy on April 26th. As of this writing, its unclear if he was buried in Ireland or if his body was returned to the United States and he was buried in Providence.

His Find a Grave memorial number is 126452751
 
Sinnott, Peter Aloysius Sr (I6623)
 
131
Peter was the son of Peter A. Sinnott and his wife, Mary Catharine Breen. He was born on July 2, 1854. Both of Peter's parents were born in St. John's County, New Brunswick, Canada.

On Nov. 2, 1900, Peter and Catherine Ada Malarkey were married. The ceremony was held at the Church of the Transfiguration in New York City.

Sometime prior to his marriage, Peter inherited the "Abbey of Enniscorthy," in County Wexford, so he and Catherine moved to Ireland. I found Peter's "Certificate of Registration of American Citizen" that he had to complete while in Ireland. It gives his date and place of birth. It also listed his wife and his two children who were living at the time.

The paperwork stated Peter and his wife left the United States for Ireland on November 3, 1900. Note that this was one day after their marriage. They traveled to Enniscorthy, County Wexford, where they stayed until June, 1904. They arrived in Dublin on July 1 of that year. The Consular Certificate said they were in Dublin to settle an estate in the Chancery Court. This must have been the estate of the relative who had willed the Abbey to Peter.

While in Enniscorthy, they at least three children. Catherine Elenore was born in 1901. This corresponds with Catherine's sister, Anna's, notes that their first child, born in County Wexford, was a daughter whom they named Catherine. Anna's notes also state that the little girl died there as well. Catherine's nephew, Howard Zellers, wrote in 1977 of "...a son Peter who died while they lived at the Abbey and was buried on the Abbey Estate. At the time of his death he was about two years of age."
So far I haven't found a record of this child.

On February 5, 2017, I emailed St. Aidan's Cathedral in Enniscorthy, asking for information on the births of the children born there to Peter A Sinnott and Catherine Malarkey. I received a response from a gentleman named Hugo Kelly. He had researched the baptismal records and found only two children: Catherine Eleanor, born on September 27, 1901 and Nicholas John, born November 18, 1903. Both were baptized in St. Aiden's. There was no mention of a child named Peter, nor was there a death recorded for Catherine Eleanor. Since the family moved to Dublin in 1904, she might have died there. However, Anna Malarkey Obenland, her aunt, wrote that she died in Wexford.

In a letter to me dated May 29, 1977, Catherine's cousin, Mary Malarkey Starner, wrote of the family lore, "He (Peter) being the eldest son inherited a poverty stricken estate which by law or otherwise always passed from the oldest son to the oldest son. After they married they went to Ireland to live and 3 children were born to them. Nicholas Sennate (sic. should be Peter Sinnott) was not a Catholic as the previous heir had been and who had an alter (sic) in the "Abbey" which Nicholas (sic) and Catherine had removed, consequently the tale was that the 2 oldest of their children were poisoned by "fairies" as a punishment for having the alter (sic) removed. The other child, a son, died in the Irish Rebellion in the early 1920's."

On March 18, 1903, Peter and Catherine's son Nicholas was born in Enniscorthy. Daughter Eleanor was born in Dublin on December 19, 1909. Unfortunately, Eleanor died when she was ten years old. Nicholas passed away at the age of twenty-two.

The 1901 Irish Census lists Peter and Catherine at 46.2 Templeshannon St, in Enniscorthy. This was a hotel, categorized as "1st class." The couple occupied one room.

While looking through FamilySearch.org, I came across a record for Peter. It is from the collection, "Ireland, Prison Registers, 1790-1924." It says that in 1904, Peter was arrested in Wexford, County Wexford, for contempt of court. The records state that the prison where he was housed was in Wexford. Whether this was really a prison, as we think of them today, or just a town jail is unknown. Nor do we know how long he was in there. His residence at the time was Enniscorthy.

Catherine's nephew also relates, "After having lived at the Abbey some time the Irish Government confiscated their estate under the Irish Land Reform Act. They were to be compensated for their land in the amount of about forty thousand pounds. Actually they received very little except for a small pension. After her husband's death, Katherine continued to receive the pension until her death. Katherine under dower rights only had a life estate following Peter's death."

The "Irish Reform Act" mentioned above was probably the Land Purchase Act in 1909. According to Wikipedia, the Act "extended the 1903 Act by allowing for the compulsory purchase of tenanted farmland by the Land Commission, but fell far short in its financial provisions." This sounds to me like the government ran out of money. Thus, as Howard said, Peter and Catherine never received all of their proceeds. Also note the word, "compulsory". Howard used the word "confiscated" but they mean the same thing. The Sinnotts were forced to give up their land.

The Ireland Census of 1911 shows Peter and Catherine living with Nicholas and Eleanor at 29.3 Sandwith St., St Mark's Parish, Trinity Ward, Dublin, Ireland. The four members of the family were all living in one room. It states that they had had three children, with two alive at that time. This means was the child Peter is just family lore.

That census says that Peter was a "landed proprietor" and a landlord. The family was Roman Catholic.

Peter passed away in Dublin on December 11, 1930. His residence at the time was 62 Denzile St. On 11 March 2014, I checked Google Earth. At that time, there was no Denzile St. There was, however, a Denzille Lane.

He was buried in Dean's Grange Cemetery (aka Deansgrange). I wrote to the cemetery in the 1970's and received the plots of Peter and his family. On his burial record, Peter's last name is spelled "Synnott." According to a Find A Grave Volunteer, none of the family have gravestones. His plot is 25-F3-North.

As a side note, a lady named Ellen Breen is buried in the same grave as the Sinnotts. Peter's mother's maiden name was Catherine Breen. It's hard to imagine this is a coincidence. Ellen was the widow of a Patrick Breen. She passed away in 1901 at the age of 70 years old, which would make her birth date in about 1831. I wonder if Patrick was Peter's Uncle? If so, this might be a clue as to where Catherine Breen's family was from. (County Wexford, possibly Enniscorthy.) A Margaret Tobin is buried there as well. Could she be another relative? More research is needed in that regard.

Peter's Find a Grave memorial number is 36158925.
 
Sinnott, Peter Aloysius Jr (I6616)
 
132
The Batesville Herald Tribune
Wed Apr 22, 2009

Omer F. Prickel, 84, Batesville, died Sunday, April 19, 2009, at University Hospital, Cincinnati.

Born Oct. 20, 1924, in Morris, he was the son of the late John and Rosa (Roell) Prickel. He married Naomi (Fisher) Prickel July 17, 1948, at St. John's Catholic Church, Enochsburg, and she survives.

The Batesville Eagles Aerie 1130 member served as St. Anne's Catholic Church, Hamburg, picnic chairman for 20 years before joining St. Louis Catholic Church, where he was a eucharistic minister. The two-term Franklin County commissioner was also a Salt Creek Township Advisory Board member. The lifelong farmer liked golfing, taking motorcycle rides and playing card games. The staunch Democrat was actively involved in politics and was a McDonald's morning coffee group member. Prickel and his wife loved to take vacations, with Myrtle Beach, S.C., a favorite destination. The devoted Cincinnati Reds fan attended the Indianapolis 500 for many years. His favorite pastime was lunch out with his wife followed by an afternoon ride in the country.

Survivors also include one sister: Rita Stahley, Cincinnati; one brother: Alban Prickel, Morris; a sister-in-law: Shirley "Scoop" Giesting, Enochsburg; a brother-in-law: Robert Fisher, Greensburg; and many nieces and nephews.

He was also preceded in death by four brothers: Max, Cletus, David and Ivo Prickel.

Visitation is Wednesday, April 22, starting with a 4 p.m. rosary service until 7 p.m. at Weigel Funeral Home. The Rev. Dennis Duvelius will officiate the 10 a.m. funeral Thursday, April 23, at St. Louis Catholic Church. Burial is at the church cemetery. Memorials may be made to the St. Louis Cemetery Fund or Margaret Mary Community Hospital Cafeteria Fund.
 
Prickel, Omer Francis (I5608)
 
133 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Peters, John Charles (I5228)
 
134
This could be David Obenland, another child of Gustave August and Jennie Belle Strachan. More research is needed. 
Obenland, Unknown (I12976)
 
135
Twin of Clarence. 
Weintraut, Lawrence Nicholas Sr (I5918)
 
136
Twin of Gary 
Bauer, Greg (I5124)
 
137 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Peters, Jean (I5215)
 
138 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Peters, James (I5216)
 
139
Twin of Joseph. 
Weintraut, Mary Ann (I5912)
 
140
Twin of Lawrence. 
Weintraut, Clarence John (I5917)
 
141
Twin of Leo Jr. 
Weintraut, Mary Elizabeth (I6055)
 
142
Twin of Mary Ann (Mayme). 
Weintraut, Joseph G (I5913)
 
143
Twin of Mary Beth
 
Weintraut, Leo Peter Jr (I6051)
 
144
Vance was the son of Robert January Huston and his wife, Kate Francis. He was actually born in Chehalis County, Washington but that's now Grays Harbor County.

For years I have looking for documents pertaining to my grandfather's brother, Robert Huston, but couldn't find anything past the 1880 Census. Then today I found that someone on Ancestry had copied my mother's information. I checked that tree, and found the missing Robert, my mother's uncle.

From there I found that he was married and had two sons, Vance and James. I found information on both of them, including a memorial here on Find A Grave for James. There was none for Vance.

From what I could find, Robert and his wife separated and Robert took both boys and went to Japan. The first record of them that I found was a Certificate of Registration of American Citizen, completed on Aug 31, 1907 in Nagasaki, Japan. Robert and his sons were then living in Shimonoseki, Japan. The same documents were found for 1909 and 1911. Others may exist as well.

In 1911, Vance returned to the United States. I haven't found any records for him from 1911 until 1920. In the 1920 Census, Vance is listed as living at the California State Hospital, aka Patton Mental Hospital, in San Bernardino County, California. It was there that he died on October 21, 1932.

Vance's death certificate, which I received in April, 2014, offered some new information. Prior to entering the hospital, he lived in Los Angeles County and worked as a waiter. Vance was admitted to Patton Mental Hospital on October 4, 1918.

His cause of death is listed as chronic myocarditis, with a 16 year history of dementia praecox. According to Wikipedia, "Dementia praecox (a 'premature dementia' or 'precocious madness') refers to a chronic, deteriorating psychotic disorder characterized by rapid cognitive disintegration, usually beginning in the late teens or early adulthood." Today we know this as schizophrenia.

Vance was buried in Forest Lawn Memorial Park in Glendale, California. His brother James was laid to rest next to him in 1960.
 
Huston, Vance Morton (I6735)
 
145
Vance was the son of Robert January Huston and his wife, Kate Francis. He was actually born in Chehalis County, Washington but that's now Grays Harbor County.

For years I have looking for documents pertaining to my grandfather's brother, Robert Huston, but couldn't find anything past the 1880 Census. Then today I found that someone on Ancestry had copied my mother's information. I checked that tree, and found the missing Robert, my mother's uncle.

From there I found that he was married and had two sons, Vance and James. I found information on both of them, including a memorial here on Find A Grave for James. There was none for Vance.

From what I could find, Robert and his wife separated and Robert took both boys and went to Japan. The first record of them that I found was a Certificate of Registration of American Citizen, completed on Aug 31, 1907 in Nagasaki, Japan. Robert and his sons were then living in Shimonoseki, Japan. The same documents were found for 1909 and 1911. Others may exist as well.

In 1911, Vance returned to the United States. I haven't found any records for him from 1911 until 1920. In the 1920 Census, Vance is listed as living at the California State Hospital, aka Patton Mental Hospital, in San Bernardino County, California. It was there that he died on October 21, 1932.

Vance's death certificate, which I received in April, 2014, offered some new information. Prior to entering the hospital, he lived in Los Angeles County and worked as a waiter. Vance was admitted to Patton Mental Hospital on October 4, 1918.

His cause of death is listed as chronic myocarditis, with a 16 year history of dementia praecox. According to Wikipedia, "Dementia praecox (a 'premature dementia' or 'precocious madness') refers to a chronic, deteriorating psychotic disorder characterized by rapid cognitive disintegration, usually beginning in the late teens or early adulthood." Today we know this as schizophrenia.

Vance was buried in Forest Lawn Memorial Park in Glendale, California. His brother James was laid to rest next to him in 1960.
 
Huston, Vance Morton (I6735)
 
146
When researching my family in 1979, I accidentally found that a Donald Obenland was born to my father, Harold Edwin Obenland and a "Mary Jane" Flaugher. (See my memorial to Donald linked to this memorial below).

I looked and looked and never found Donald until after he died in 2003. I had also been looking for his mother, but also to no avail. There were Flaughers listed as living in the bay area of California, but I couldn't pin-point Mary Jane's family. Then last year, I found two newspaper articles mentioning a Marion Flaugher, who was the correct age for Mary Jane, who had lived in Richmond, California and had had a son named Donald. So, Mary Jane Flaugher was really Marion Flaugher!

From there, I found that her parents were Julius Lord Flaugher and his wife, Nellie George. In fact, in the 1940 Census, I located Julius and Nellie in Aurora, Kane County, Illinois. Living with them was their grandson, Donald "Abenland."

From there I found that a Marion Hubbart had died in 1981 in San Diego, California. The California Death Index listed her father's last name as Flaugher and her mother's maiden name as George.

I haven't found another definite record for Marion between the newspaper article in 1927 and her death record in 1981. I did, however, find a record of a marriage between a Marion Flaugher and a Fred B. Campbell on Feb. 28, 1934 in Seattle, Washington. The age is correct, but there is no way of knowing if this is the correct person.

UPDATE #1: I received an email in August, 2013 regarding Marion. A distant relative gave me the information that her father was not Julius Flaugher, even though that last name was used in all of the newspaper articles and on Donald's birth certificate. Whether Julius Flaugher adopted Marion is unknown at this time. Julius's memorial is number 28545591.

Marion's real father was Stacy Honor Pigott. He and Nellie, Marion's mother, were married in Kane County, Illinois on June 21, 1899. At first I was skeptical, but then I remembered that one of Donald's roommates told me that Donald talked about a sister with the last name of Pigott, who lived in the bay area of California. I want to thank Cheryl Rene for the information and for the two other newspaper articles on Marion and her abandonment of Donald. Look at that, I now have a picture of Donald as a baby and one of his young mother.

I'm at a loss as to whether to change this memorial to Marion Piggott Hubbart. Since it seems as though she used the last name of Flaugher, I think I'll keep it the way it is and just add another memorial with her birth name and cross reference it to this.

More research is needed. I'm interested in finding out if this sister had any children who might still be around.

If anyone out there knows anything about Donald or his mother or family, please contact me!
 
Pigott, Marion (I6335)
 
147
Will of Anna Elizabeth Bachmann Weintraut

I, Elizabeth Weintraut being of sound mind and disposing memory do hereby make and declare this to be my last Will and Testament and I hereby revoke any and all wills by me heretofore made.

Item 1. It is my will that my executor shall pay all of my just debts, including the debts of my last sickness and funeral expenses.

Item 2. I give and devise to the Parrish Priest in charge of St. Vincent Catholic Church, One Hundred ($100.00) dollars for Masses for the repose of my soul and the deceased members of my family.

Item 3. I will and devise and give to my two boys. Clemence J. Weintrant and Lawrence N. Weintrant, each the sum of Four Hundred ($400.00) dollars, the same to be used in their education. Should I live to educate them myself then this Item of my said Will shall be considered satisfied.

Item 4. I will, devise and bequeath to my two daughters Hildagardis F. Weintrant and Irene C. Weintrant, each the sum of Two Hundred ($200.00) dollars. The same to be paid to them each at her marriage or should I die then upon the Finial Settlement of my estate of the end of the First Year however if I shall have paid to either of said daughters said sum during my like time then the amount shall be considered satisfied.

Item 5. I will. devise and bequeath to each of my three sons, Les P. E., Clemence J. and Lawrence N. Weintrant each the sum of Five Hundred ($500.00) dollars the same to be paid to each of them within one year after my death without interest. This bequeath however is not to interfere in any way with the Bequest of #3 of this Will. If any of my said sons should marry and I have given him the amount herein willed or my part of it then that amount shall be deducted from the amount so bequeathed herein and shall be considered satisfied to that amount.

Item 6. The balance of my estate real, personal and mixed, I will devise and bequeath to my children now living Viz. Victorian A. Higgins, Mary M. Soller, Les. P.E. Weintrant, Hildagardis F. Weintrant, Irene C. Weintrant, Clemence J. Weintrant, and Lawrence N. Weintrant to be divided between them equally, share and share alike.

Item 7. I hereby appoint my son in law Edwin Soller as the Executor of this my last Will and Testament.

Witness my hand and seal the August 29, 1913.

Signed: Elizabeth Weintrant (seal)
Witnesses:
Lawrence Soller
Thomas H. Campbell

Recorded Book 6
pages 366 - 368
December 22, 1913

Transcibed by Wanda

Note: Clemence should read Clarence. This is a transcription error. 
Bachmann, Anna Elizabeth (I4463)
 
148 Unterhausen became part of Lichtenstein in 1975 Hartstein, Matthaeus (I9147)
 
149 "10 miles east of Shelbyville." Age: 18 Zinser, Robert Louis (I6558)
 
150 "13 Persons Killed On Hoosier Roads

...William R Lester, 22, Evansville, and Rosemary Weintraut, 20, Mount Vernon, were killed early Sunday where their car left a curve on IN 69, a half mile north of Farmersville and struck a tree."

The Vidette-Messenger, 11 Jun 1956, page 1, column 5. 
Weintraut, Rose Mary (I6245)
 

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